Annual Report 2013
The state of the world's human rights

7 July 2011

Landmark ECHR ruling recognizes right to conscientious objection

Landmark ECHR ruling recognizes right to conscientious objection

A landmark ruling by the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) for the first time explicitly recognizing the right to conscientious objection to military service has been welcomed by Amnesty International.

Today's court judgement found in favour of Vahan Bayatyan, a Jehovah's Witness in Armenia who received a two and half year prison sentence in 2003 after he refused to perform military service on the grounds of conscientious objection.

The court ruled that states must respect the right to conscientious objection as part of their obligation to respect the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.

"With today's decision, European law is now clearly in line with international standards on conscientious objection," said Michael Bochenek, Amnesty International’s Director of Law and Policy.

"Azerbaijan and Turkey - the only European states that do not provide for this right- should now move immediately to do so."

Vahan Bayatyan refused to perform military service when he was called up in 2001. He was convicted of draft evasion, although he said that he was prepared to do alternative civilian service, and he was sentenced to one and a half years in prison.

In 2003, his sentence was increased to two and a half years after the prosecution appealed, claiming that his conscientious objection was “unfounded and dangerous”.

He was released on parole in July 2003, after serving ten-and-a-half months of his sentence. He filed his case with the European Court later the same month.

When Armenia joined the Council of Europe in 2000, it committed to the Alternative Service Act of 17 December 2003, which made provision for conscientious objectors to military service including the creation of an "Alternative Civilian Service".

At no time was Bayatyan given the option of performing this service.

Jehovah's Witnesses who have since opted for the alternative service found that it was not clearly civilian in nature and included requirements such as the swearing of a military oath and the wearing of military uniforms. As such it does not comply with international standards.

Read More

European Court of Human Rights affirms the right to conscientious objection to military service (Joint public statement, 7 July 2011)

Country

Armenia 
Azerbaijan 
Turkey 

Region

Europe And Central Asia 
Europe And Central Asia 

Issue

Detention 
Economic, Social and Cultural Rights 
Freedom Of Expression 
International Organizations 

@amnestyonline on twitter

News

25 July 2014

The sentencing of a newspaper editor and a human rights lawyer to two years in prison on charges of contempt of court after a grossly unfair trial in Swaziland is an outrageous... Read more »

24 July 2014

The prolonged execution of a prisoner in Arizona yesterday represents another wake-up call for authorities in the USA to abolish the death penalty, said Amnesty International... Read more »

22 July 2014

Indonesia’s new President Joko Widodo must deliver on campaign promises to improve Indonesia’s dire human rights situation, Amnesty International said.

Read more »
24 July 2014

Poland is the first European Union member state to be found complicit in the USA’s rendition, secret detention, and torture of alleged terrorism suspects, Amnesty International... Read more »

25 July 2014

Amnesty International's experts respond to some of the questions raised around the Israel/Gaza conflict.

Read more »