Annual Report 2013
The state of the world's human rights

17 May 2013

Argentina: Death of former military leader who did not escape justice

Argentina: Death of former military leader who did not escape justice
Former military president Jorge Rafael Videla, 87, died this morning in the Marcos Paz prison in Buenos Aires.

Former military president Jorge Rafael Videla, 87, died this morning in the Marcos Paz prison in Buenos Aires.

© JUAN MABROMATA/AFP/Getty Images


Argentina led the way in the prosecution of those responsible for the torture, killing and disappearance of thousands of people during the many military governments across Latin America.
Source: 
Mariela Belski, Director of Amnesty International in Argentina.

Argentina’s former military leader, Jorge Rafael Videla, has died in prison, where he was serving a life sentence for crimes against humanity committed during his time in office.

“Argentina led the way in the prosecution of those responsible for the torture, killing and disappearance of thousands of people during the many military governments across Latin America,” said Mariela Belski, Director of Amnesty International in Argentina.

“We urge Argentina and other countries in the region to continue with their efforts to bring all those responsible for the terrible crimes committed during the region’s darkest years to justice. There is still much work to be done."

Former military president Jorge Rafael Videla, 87, died this morning in the Marcos Paz prison in Buenos Aires.

Last year, he was sentenced to 50 years in prison for his part in the systematic kidnapping of children during the country’s military regime between 1976 and 1983.

"From the start of Videla's rule, Amnesty International received claims about human rights violations and, in November 1976, sent a research mission to Argentina. The result was the release of a comprehensive report detailing detention without judicial order and torture. There was also the first list of disappeared people."

When he died, Videla was also being tried for his role in Plan Condor – a  secret coordinated operation by Latin American countries for the exchange, persecution and disappearance of political activists.

He led the military coup in Argentina in March 1976 and was head of the military junta until 1981. Argentinian human rights groups claim that at least 30,000 people were kidnapped, tortured and disappeared during Argentina’s military government.

Country

Argentina 

Region

Americas 

Issue

Crimes Against Humanity And War Crimes 
Detention 
Disappearances And Abductions 
Extrajudicial Executions And Other Unlawful Killings 
Impunity 
Torture And Ill-treatment 
Trials And Legal Systems 

@amnestyonline on twitter

News

18 September 2014

Nigeria’s police and military routinely torture women, men, and children – some as young as 12 – using a wide range of methods including beatings, shootings and rape... Read more »

04 September 2014

For years Amnesty International has been investigating and recording evidence of torture in Mexico. Here're some of the most shocking facts. 

Read more »
18 September 2014

The conviction of four peaceful protesters by a Thai military court today is an affront to justice and another sign of repression under military rule. 

Read more »
15 September 2014

European leaders must do more to provide safe and legal ways for refugees and migrants to access international protection in the European Union.

Read more »
18 September 2014

A controversial new cybercrimes law that criminalizes the spreading of “false news” on the internet poses a serious threat to freedom of expression in Qatar.

Read more »