Annual Report 2013
The state of the world's human rights

17 September 2013

Bangladesh: Death sentence without right of judicial appeal defies human rights law

Bangladesh: Death sentence without right of judicial appeal defies human rights law
Bangladeshi social activists shout slogans in Dhaka on September 17, 2013, after a verdict was delivered against Abdul Quader Molla.

Bangladeshi social activists shout slogans in Dhaka on September 17, 2013, after a verdict was delivered against Abdul Quader Molla.

© MUNIR UZ ZAMAN/AFP/Getty Images


We are very concerned about the Supreme Court’s ruling and the apparent relentless effort by the government to ensure that Mollah could be put to death. We urge Bangladeshi authorities to commute his death sentence, and to impose a moratorium on executions as a first step towards abolishing the death penalty
Source: 
Abbas Faiz, Amnesty International’s Bangladesh Researcher
Date: 
Tue, 17/09/2013

Bangladesh should immediately commute the death sentence of Abdul Quader Mollah, Amnesty International said after the Supreme Court increased his sentence from life imprisonment to death following an appeal by the government.

Mollah, a senior leader in the opposition Jamaat-e-Islami party was first sentenced to life imprisonment for crimes against humanity by the Bangladeshi International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) in February 2013. The tribunal was set up in 2010 to try those accused of committing war crimes during Bangladesh’s 1971 independence war.

“We are very concerned about the Supreme Court’s ruling and the apparent relentless effort by the government to ensure that Mollah could be put to death. We urge Bangladeshi authorities to commute his death sentence, and to impose a moratorium on executions as a first step towards abolishing the death penalty,” said Abbas Faiz, Amnesty International’s Bangladesh Researcher.

The death sentence was handed down by the highest court in the country, giving Mollah no chance to appeal. The imposition of the death sentence without the possibility of appeal is incompatible with Bangladesh’s obligations under international human rights law.

“Imposing a death sentence without the right of judicial appeal defies human rights law. There is no question that the victims of Bangladesh’s independence war deserve justice, but one human rights violation does not cancel out another. Executions are a symptom of a culture of violence rather than a solution to it,” said Faiz.

“This is the first known case of a prisoner sentenced to death directly by the highest court in Bangladesh. It is also the first known death sentence in Bangladesh with no right of appeal.”

Amnesty International opposes the death penalty in all cases without exception, regardless of the nature or circumstances of the crime; guilt, innocence or other characteristics of the individual; or the method used by the state to carry out the execution.

Campaigns

Abolish the death penalty  

Country

Bangladesh 

Region

Asia And The Pacific 

Issue

Crimes Against Humanity And War Crimes 
Death Penalty 
Trials And Legal Systems 

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