Rapport 2013
La situation des droits humains dans le monde

4 avril 2013

Wake-up call for a giant: The EU must end discrimination against Roma

Wake-up call for a giant: The EU must end discrimination against Roma
Roma communities across Europe routinely face forced evictions and lack of basic services

Roma communities across Europe routinely face forced evictions and lack of basic services

© Mugur Vărzariu


En un coup d'œil

Discrimination against Roma in numbers

  •  Between 10 and 12 million Roma live in Europe – half of them in EU member states.
  •  Eight out of 10 Roma households in the EU are at risk of poverty.
  • 53 per cent of Europeans believe society could benefit from better integration of the Roma.  
  • In 2012 11,803 evictions of Roma were carried out in France alone.
  • Over the past six years, there has been an average of one eviction of Roma every other day in Italy.
  • In Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Bulgaria, between January 2008 and July 2012, there have been more than 120 serious violent attacks against Romani people and their property, including shootings, stabbings and Molotov cocktails.

Sources:Council of Europe, Fundamental Rights Agency/UNDP, European Commission

See video
The EU must implement immediately the considerable measures at its disposal to sanction governments that are failing to tackle discrimination and violence against Roma.
Source: 
John Dalhuisen, Europe and Central Asia Programme Director at Amnesty International.

The European Union (EU) is not doing enough to end discrimination against Roma across its member-states, Amnesty International said on the eve of International Roma Day marked on 8 April.

“The EU must implement immediately the considerable measures at its disposal to sanction governments that are failing to tackle discrimination and violence against Roma,” said John Dalhuisen, Europe and Central Asia Programme Director at Amnesty International.

"Such practices run counter to EU law and the principles of liberty, democracy and respect for human rights it was founded on.”

The estimated six million Roma living in EU countries fall far below the national average on almost all human development indicators -- eight out of ten Roma are at risk of poverty; only one out of seven young Roma adults have completed upper-secondary education.

Forced evictions of Roma continue to be the norm rather than the exception in a range of European countries such as Romania, Italy, and France.

And education is segregated in the Czech Republic, Greece and Slovakia. This is at odds with national and EU laws prohibiting racial discrimination.

More than 120 serious violent attacks against Roma and their property occurred in Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Bulgaria between January 2008 and July 2012, including shootings, stabbings and arson attacks. State authorities, including the police, have in many instances failed to prevent or thoroughly investigate these attacks.

In 2000, the EU adopted the Race Equality Directive that prohibits discrimination based on race or ethnicity in the workplace, education, access to goods and services, housing and health care. The EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights, which entered in force in 2009, also prohibits discrimination and enshrines the rights to education, social and housing assistance and work.

As EU’s executive body, the European Commission is empowered to act against EU member states when they fail to comply with EU law and the Charter.

However, so far this has never happened with regard to policies and practices discriminating against the Roma or any other ethnic minority.

“The European Commission has the powers to make a lasting impact on the lives of marginalized and discriminated communities in Europe, including the Roma. Regrettably, it has so far been hesitant to act against states which have violated the human rights of Roma,” said Dalhuisen.

“What we see is the Commission sanctioning countries on technical issues in areas of transport and taxation, for example, but failing to grapple with issues which are of vital importance to millions of people such as forced evictions, segregation and hate-motivated attacks.

“The Nobel Peace Prize winning EU has the power to end discriminatory practices that are rife in many of its member States. It must use these now.”

Amnesty International’s briefing Human rights here. Roma rights now. A wake-up call for the European Union is a call to the EU to take decisive action and play a central role in ending the discrimination against Roma in Europe.

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Thème

Discrimination 
Droits économiques, sociaux et culturels 
Roma Rights 

Région ou pays

Europe et Asie centrale 

FICHE

Europe. Ici et maintenant, droits humains pour les Roms. Un coup de semonce pour l'Union européenne

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